Computations in Science Seminars
Jan
28
Wed 12:15
Seth Lloyd, MIT
e-mail:
Host: Leo Kadanoff ()
Organizer: Shiladitya Banerjee ()
Quantum algorithms for machine learning and big data analysis

Machine-learning tasks frequently involve problems of manipulating and classifying large numbers of vectors in high-dimensional spaces. Quantum computers are good at manipulating high-dimensional vectors in large tensor product spaces. This talk shows how quantum computers can provide an exponential speed-up over their classical counterparts for a variety of problems in machine learning and big data analysis.

Feb
4
Wed 12:15
Zheng-Tian Lu, Argonne
Host: Daniel Holz ()
Organizer: Sayantan Majumdar ()
Atom Trap, Krypton-81, and Global Groundwater

The long-lived noble-gas isotope 81Kr is the ideal tracer for water and ice with ages of 10^5 – 10^6 years, a range beyond the reach of 14C. 81Kr-dating, a concept pursued over the past five decades by numerous laboratories employing a variety of techniques, is finally available to the earth science community at large. This is made possible by the development of the Atom Trap Trace Analysis (ATTA) method, in which individual atoms of the desired isotope are captured and detected. ATTA possesses superior selectivity, and is thus far used to analyze the environmental radioactive isotopes 81Kr, 85Kr, and 39Ar, These three isotopes have extremely low isotopic abundances in the range of 10^-16 to 10^-11, and cover a wide range of ages and applications. In collaboration with earth scientists, we are dating groundwater and mapping its flow in major aquifers around the world. We have also demonstrated for the first time 81Kr-dating of old ice.

Feb
11
Wed 12:15
Giulia Galli, University of Chicago
e-mail:
Host: Leo Kadanoff ()
Organizer: Ivo Peters ()
Materials discovery and scientific design by computation: a revolution still in the making

The need of advanced materials for sustainable energy resources and next generation information technology requires the development of integrated scientific strategies, encompassing theoretical innovations, and computational and laboratory experiments. Substantial progress has been made in the last two decades in understanding and predicting the fundamental properties of materials and molecular systems from first principles, i.e. from numerical solutions of the basic equations of quantum mechanics. However the field of ab initio predictions is in its infancy; some formidable theoretical and computational challenges lie ahead of us, including the collection and use of data generated by simulations. We will describe recent progress and successes obtained in predicting properties of matter by quantum simulations, and discuss algorithmic challenges in connection with the use of evolving high-performance computing architectures. We will also discuss open issues related to the validation of the approximate, first principles theories used in large-scale quantum simulations.

Feb
18
Wed 12:15
Daniel Hexner, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology
e-mail:
Host: Tom Witten (t-witten@uchicago.edu)
Organizer: Ivo Peters ()
Unusual Fluctuations in Absorbing State Models

Systems with short-range interactions show sqrt(N) fluctuations in equilibrium, except near a critical point, where the fluctuations diverge, with different scaling. We study a class of non-equilibrium systems with a continuous phase transition separating an “absorbing” phase (where the dynamics ultimately ceases) from an “active” phase (where diffusive-like dynamics persists forever). Remarkably even though the interactions are finite ranged, the dynamics lead to a “hyperuniform” state with diminished density fluctuations at the critical point. This prediction can be tested experimentally using a system of sheared colloids. In addition, we derive a scaling relation that relates the anomalous density fluctuations to other known exponents and study the effect of infinitesimal diffusion.

Feb
25
Wed 12:15
Heinrich Jaeger, University of Chicago
e-mail:
Host: Leo Kadanoff ()
Organizer: Shiladitya Banerjee ()
Mar
11
Wed 12:15
Norbert Scherer, University of Chicago
e-mail:
Host: Leo Kadanoff ()
Organizer: Sayantan Majumdar ()
Mar
18
Wed 12:15
Jonathon Simon, University of Chicago
e-mail:
Host: Leo Kadanoff ()
Organizer: Kim Weirich ()
Mar
25
Wed 12:15
Daniel Koll, University of Chicago
e-mail:
Host: Wendy Zhang ()
Deciphering the atmospheres of terrestrial exoplanets
Apr
1
Wed 12:15
Andrea Bertozzi, UCLA
e-mail:
Host: Leo Kadanoff ()
Apr
8
Wed 12:15
Emmanuel Villermaux, Institut Universitaire de France
e-mail:
Host: William Irvine ()
Apr
15
Wed 12:15
Michael Brenner, Harvard
e-mail:
Host: Leo Kadanoff ()
Apr
22
Wed 12:15
Joseph Vallino, Marine Biological Labortory
e-mail:
Host: Leo Kadanoff ()
Apr
29
Wed 12:15
Michael Rubenstein, Harvard
e-mail:
Host: Leo Kadanoff ()
May
6
Wed 12:15
Tim Sanchez, Harvard
e-mail:
Host: Leo Kadanoff ()
May
13
Wed 12:15
Luis Bettencourt, Santa Fe Institute
e-mail:
Host: Daniel Holz ()
May
20
Wed 12:15
Andrew Ferguson, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
e-mail:
Host: Leo Kadanoff ()
May
27
Wed 12:15
Matthew Pinson, University of Chicago
e-mail:
Host: Leo Kadanoff ()
Jun
3
Wed 12:15
Alisa Bokulich, Boston University
e-mail:
Host: Leo Kadanoff ()
Jun
10
Wed 12:15
OPEN
Jun
17
Wed 12:15
OPEN
Jun
24
Wed 12:15
OPEN
Jul
1
Wed 12:15
OPEN
Jul
8
Wed 12:15
OPEN
Jul
15
Wed 12:15
OPEN
Jul
22
Wed 12:15
OPEN
Jul
29
Wed 12:15
OPEN
Aug
5
Wed 12:15
OPEN
Aug
12
Wed 12:15
OPEN
Aug
19
Wed 12:15
OPEN
Aug
26
Wed 12:15
OPEN
Sep
2
Wed 12:15
OPEN
Sep
9
Wed 12:15
OPEN
Sep
16
Wed 12:15
OPEN
Sep
23
Wed 12:15
OPEN